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Week 36 {tiny paintings project}

This Week: SPECIMEN ENVELOPES

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Clip these envelopes to your belt or pack, to keep your collection handy.  Organize and label specimens from nature hikes: flowers, leaves, soil or sand samples, and favorite pebbles. Make a camp craft kit with beads and strings for friendship bracelets.  Or fill each envelope with travel souvenirs: coins, ticket stubs and stamps.These cute specimen envelopes are a creative addition to your gear.

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GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.


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FIG. 1 Supplies:  Hole punch sized for eyelets or a small punch and an awl to stretch out the hole, hammer, eyelet kit, s-biner or caribiner clip, jump rings, glue stick, scissors, printouts for as many envelopes as you want, bone folder, TRACING PAPER, pencil.

FIG. 2 Cut out the artwork. Put a piece of tracing paper on top of art. Draw along the dotted lines and across the edges of the light blue. Cut out the rectangle of trace.

FIG. 3 Fold the flaps in and score with the bone folder.

FIG. 4 Cut out the light blue rectangle.

FIG. 5 Replace the light blue section with the tracing paper. Glue and let dry.

FIG. 6 Fold the flaps. Glue and press to dry. Don’t glue the envelope closed.

FIG. 7 Cut out the tab. Fold and glue the triangle down. Punch the hole. Stretch the hole out with an awl or pencil tip until it’s just big enough to fit the eyelet. Install eyelet.

FIG. 8 Glue the tab on top of the envelope and press to dry.

FIG. 9 I seal the envelope with a tape ball under the flap.

FIG. 10 Add the jump ring to the top.

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Week 35 {tiny paintings project}

This Week: TINY TRAIL MARKERS

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These trail markers are about 5” tall. You can make them larger or smaller, depending on the stack of rocks.  Use them to mark a trail for a scavenger hunt, for parties and events, or in the office.

Trail markers are traditionally made from a balanced stack of rocks. But you may want to use a glue gun, poster tack, abc gum, craft clay, whatever you have around, to stick them together. Just make sure the rocks are clean for easier adhesion.

Caution: wire can be sharp, wear gloves and assist children.

Week_35_download_web

GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.

Week_35_layout_web

FIG. 1 Supplies: Printout, decorative paper (I used craft paper), needle nose pliers, wire cutters, scissors, rocks, 1/8” diameter twigs, ¾” duct tape, washi tape, packing tape, 20 gauge copper wire, ruler.

You can skip the packing and duct tape if you don’t need your trail markers to be weatherproof.

FIG. 2 Cut a strip of paper 1 ¼” wide x 2” tall. Evenly place pieces of washi tape under the edges of the paper.

FIG. 3 Fold the tape over to the front of the paper, so the edges are nicely banded. Fold the paper in half vertically, and cut points on the ends.

FIG. 4 Cut out the art on the black outlines. Stick a tape ball to the back of the art.

FIG. 5 Stick the arrow right in the center of the banner.

FIG. 6 Place the banner face-down on top of a horizontal piece of packing tape.

FIG. 7 Fold the tape over the back to seal it up. If your packing tape isn’t quite wide enough, you can leave an uncovered bit of banner at the top.

FIG. 8 Cut a strip of duct tape the width of the banner. Lay the top edge of the banner on top of the tape (same as fig. 2). Cut a 4” piece of wire. Place the wire at the top edge of the banner and fold over the tape.

FIG. 9 Using the wire cutters, cut a 2” twig. Fold the wire ends up and place them on top of the twig.

FIG. 10 Wrap the wire around the twig two times. Trim the ends and pinch the sharp edges close to the twig.

FIG. 11 Cut a 20” (longer if you want to use a rock base bigger than 1 ½”) piece of wire. Tread the wire between the banner and the twig. Bring both ends of the wire together unevenly,with 6” on one side. Using the pliers, start twisting the wires tightly around the twig.

FIG. 12 After a couple of twists, pinch the wires between your fingers and continue twisting until about 1” of twist shows below the center of the banner.

FIG. 13 Wrap the long wire end around the front of a 1” to 1 ½” rock. Bring the short wire end around to meet it at the back of the rock and tightly twist the ends together. Don’t join the wires underneath the rock, or it won’t stand up.

FIG. 14 Trim the short end and fold the sharp end under. Continue wrapping the remaining wire around the rock, keeping the tension taught. End by wrapping the wire end around the base of the twisted stand. Trim the end and pinch the sharp end down.

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Week 34 {tiny paintings project}

This Week: BEAR BELLS

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Bear Bells are meant to let a bear know you are coming when you’re hiking. Nothing worse than a startled bear. They aren’t proven to work, but are nonetheless very popular, in a “why not be extra protected” way.  This kid’s camp craft version, makes getting geared-up fun.

I used a cordless drill in the instructions, but if you want to take this craft project camping, bring a swiss army knife with an awl, and carve out the holes.

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GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.

Week_34_layout_web

FIG. 1 Supplies: 1/8” craft plywood (from an art supply store), 7 cable (zip) ties (I used 8” but 6” would be easier to work with, just drill smaller holes.), pencil, 3 tiny s-biner or carabiner clips, Tacky glue, glue brush, masking tape, felt (or ribbon or decorative duct tape), nine ¾” jingle bells, coping saw, printout, wire cutters, scissors, 100 grit sandpaper, drill, and 5/32 drill bit.

FIG. 2 cut out all the artwork just outside the black outline. Trace around the badges with a pencil, on the plywood.

FIG. 3 cover the back of the plywood with masking tape, so it doesn’t chip when you saw.

FIG. 4 Slowly and carefully cut 1/8” to 1/16” outside the line.

FIG. 5 When you come to an inside curve, notch it out.

FIG. 6 Take the tape off the back. Wrap a piece of scrap wood with sandpaper, and smooth out the badge edges.

FIG. 7 Erase the pencil lines

FIG. 8 Glue the badge art to the wood.  Put a more tape on the back of the wood where the holes will be. Drill out the holes. Remove the tape.

FIG. 9 Optional: make some decorative ribbons ½” wide and 3” long, to hang from the plaid badge. Glue on the symbols. Glue the ribbons to the back of the badge, as seen in fig. 13.

FIG 10. To put the bells on the plaid badge, thread a zip tie through a hole from back to front. Put a bell on the tie.

FIG 11 Thread the tie back through the hole and pull the bell tight to the surface of the badge. Thread the tie through the lock and pull it tight.

FIG. 12 Snip the tail end off with the wire cutters.

FIG. 13 The back of the plaid badge.

FIG. 14  The bells hang down from this badge. So don’t go back through the same hole with the zip tie. Start like fig. 10, then bring the end around under the badge and through the lock.

FIG. 15 For the oval badge, start like fig. 10. Then add two more bells. Go back through the loop of the center bell, and then through the lock. Put the clips through the top holes, and hang the bells from your backpack or zipper-pull.

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Week 33 {tiny paintings project}

This Week: FAIRY TRAP

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I originally made this trap to catch Sticky from Week 31. I imagined a fun game for my boys, with a cargo net and covert operations, while camping in the woods. But then I got carried away with the net camouflage – I really can’t paint plain green leaves. So the fairies came out, and the cargo net became a hammock. But it’s still a trap.

This net fits an Iphone perfectly - but then I couldn't take a picture of that with my phone.

The supplies for this project are fairly simple. It just takes a while to tie the net.  Think of it like knitting, or a complex friendship bracelet. It might look complicated- but I’ve used the same overhand knot everywhere.

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GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.

Week_33_layout

FIG. 1 Supplies: 8 ½” x 11” piece of cardboard, scissors, X-acto knife (optional, but I used it to cut out the artwork because its so tiny), tape, Tacky glue, printout, ruler, natural fiber twine or cord no thicker than angel hair pasta (polyester will be too slippery).

FIG. 2 Mark off a ½” grid on the cardboard.

FIG. 3 Cut two pieces of cord  32” long. Put the ends together, fold over to make a loop, and tie an overhand knot.

FIG. 4 Repeat until you have six pairs with looped ends. Trim the knot tails.

FIG. 5 Place the strings on a line on the cardboard, then fold the loop over the back and tape it down.

FIG. 6 Take one strand from each group and tie it to its neighbor with an overhand knot.

FIG. 7 The knots should land one row down, on the + between the groups.  Tape the stragglers on the ends to the + where they would be if they had a pair.

FIG. 8 Next row, do the same thing. Start with the stragglers on the ends and pair them up with their original set. Notice there is a blank + in the middle of each diamond you form.

FIG. 9 Continue until you have eight rows of tape on the ends. The taped spots are where you will put the flora and fauna.

FIG. 10 When you get to the end you should have your original pairs matched up. Tie the ends in loops, the same way you started. Trim the ends.

FIG. 10 Take the net off the board. Use a contrasting color cord. Thread it through the loops on one end, then weave it through the loops on the sides (where the tape used to be). Go a all the way around and tie it off.  Play with it. Grab the string at the center of both ends, and you can push the net down like a cinch sack.

FIG. 12 Cut out the artwork. Fold a set of flowers in half and crease it. Put a little glue on one side and slip it through an outside loop on the net (remember the place where the tape used to be?) Pinch the flower sides together around the cord.

FIG. 13 Repeat with all the flowers and leaves. Now, how will you play with your net? I think it would make great gift wrap. 

 

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Week 32 {tiny paintings project}

This Week: DOG TAGS

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These dog tags make a fun camping craft for kids. Write your phone number on the back in case little kids wander off. Or, get a shorter chain, and use them as a backpack ID tag/charm for back to school.

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GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.

Week_32_layout_web

FIG. 1 Supplies: Two 24” lengths of ball chain and connectors (found at a hardware store), hole punch that fits the chain diameter (I used a small chain and hole), printout, pencil, chipboard (thin enough to cut with scissors), scissors, tacky glue, hemp or natural fiber cord, decorative tape (optional).

FIG. 2 Here are two options for the tags: with a taped edge, or without. Both start by cutting out the tags and arrowheads artwork. For the taped edge version, trace around the tag on the chipboard. You’ll need two copies for each tag.

FIG. 3 To make the version without tape, glue the art to the chipboard and cut around the outside leaving a small (1/16”) border of chipboard showing.  Then add the art to the other side. Punch a hole, and that’s it.

FIG. 4 Back to the taped edge version. Cut just outside the line. Punch a hole in the top. It will look just like fig 3 but the art is not glued down. Make two pieces of chipboard and glue them together.

FIG. 5 I used gold duct tape, so I had to cut it down to ½” wide. Washi tape would be nice too, and already the correct width. Wrap the tape around the tags so it is only sticking to the edges. Cut four notches at each curve and fold over the tabs.

FIG. 6 Smooth all the edges flat.

FIG. 7 Glue on the artwork and re-punch the hole.

FIG. 8 Cut out, and glue letters to spell your name or a funny phrase.

FIG 9 The arrowhead tassel. Glue one side of the arrowhead to chipboard, cut around it, then add the art to the other side. Cut a 12” piece of cord, double it up, and tie an overhand knot in the end to make a loop. Make another overhand knot about ½” down.

FIG. 10 Wrap another piece of twine around your hand 6 times leaving the ends hanging down.

FIG. 11 Tie the first cord around the looped cord with a square knot, leaving the ends hanging down.

FIG. 12 Cut another 12” length of cord. Lay it across the looped cord, just under the knot. Place the arrowhead on top and cross the cord back over.

FIG. 13 Flip the whole stack over – facing down on the table.

FIG. 14 Bring the cord ends, which are crossed over the arrowhead, around and tighten them up to make the top of the tassel. Tie a square knot.

FIG. 14 Trim the ends, and thread the tags and tassel onto the chain.

 

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Week 31 {tiny paintings project}

This Week: "STICKY" SAYS

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This would be a good kids camping craft. You don't really need the mitre box. It just helps to make the cuts straight enough for the sticks to stand up. Or, you could put the eyes and speech bubble on the end of a pencil for a back to school craft.

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GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.

Week_31_layout

FIG. 1 Supplies: Printout, sticks, thumbtacks, sand paper, glue, glue brush, scissors, paperclips, googly eyes, scissors, small hammer, chip board (thin enough to cut with scissors), and a saw and mitre box.

FIG. 2 Cut six sticks in varying sizes approximately ½” diameter x 1 ½” long.  Make sure the bottom edge is flat so the sticks stand up.

FIG. 3 Cut out the art. Glue it to the chipboard. Use the brush to get the glue all the way up to the edges.

FIG. 4 After it dries, cut around the art, leaving a small border of chipboard showing.

FIG. 5 Sand the cut if necessary.

FIG. 6 Put a thumbtack though the side of the paperclip that has one loop.

FIG. 7 Stand up your stick and decide which side should be the face.  Push the thumbtack into the opposite side of the face. It should be as close to the top of the stick as it can be without showing.

FIG. 8 Hammer it in if necessary.

FIG. 9 The thumbtack should be tight enough so that the paperclip doesn’t move.

FIG. 10 Glue the eyes on the front and add the speech bubble.

FIG. 11 Repeat with all of “Sticky’s” friends.

 

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Week 30 {tiny paintings project}

 This Week: MATCHBOX CANDY SHOP

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Here’s some teeny tiny cuteness. These miniature surprise balls are the size of candy. They fit in a portable kit, so you can set up shop anywhere on summer travels.

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GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.

Week_30_layout

FIG. 1 Supplies: Printout, Tacky glue, glue brush, washi or Scotch tape, little stapler, crepe paper (this kind is stronger), two pieces of 9” x 12” tracing paper, an empty matchbox, scissors, and two pieces of decorative paper to cover the matchbox (I used metallic crepe).

FIG. 2 You’ll also need some tiny toys to put inside the surprise balls. I used these rubber animals because they smush down into a ball shape.

FIG. 3 Fold the crepe paper onto itself several times and cut it into long ¼” ribbons.

FIG. 4 Start wrapping the animal

FIG. 5 Fold in the limbs while keeping a firm tension, and stretching the crepe as you wrap.

FIG. 6 Pinch it into a ball shape, and continue wrapping.

FIG. 7 Put a tiny dot of glue at the end. More glue = hard to unwrap.

FIG. 8 Change colors with each layer. You can also wrap in some confetti shapes. Start wrapping in an organized pattern. Hold the ball stationary and wrap the ribbon around it.  Overlap half the ribbon in a clockwise direction. You’ll be making an X on the front of the ball.

FIG. 9 When you start a new ribbon rotate the axis, so the X is in a different spot. If you keep up this organized manner, your ball will amazingly become round.

FIG. 10 Decorate the outside with stripes.

FIG. 11 Cut a piece of paper to fit in the bottom of the matchbox and overlap the ends. Don’t overlap the sides, or the box won’t open. If you’re using crepe paper, stretch it out before measuring the length.

FIG. 12 Apply glue evenly.

FIG. 13 Stick the paper to the box and smooth it out.

FIG. 14 Wrap the outside of the box too.

FIG. 14 Cut out the artwork. Glue the cash register to the top of the box so the drawer becomes your money drawer. I also added decoration with tape and a seal from the artwork.

FIG. 15 Make the bags. Fold the tracing paper in ¼, then cut on the lines. You should have eight pieces, 4 ½” x 6.” Fold a piece into a long tube, overlapping by ½” with the seam in the center. Tape over the seam and trim the ends.

FIG. 16 With the tape-side up, fold the bottom corners up, then fold up the point. Tape the point down with a small piece of tape on top of the other tape.

FIG. 17&18 Start selling. Write your name on the badge and tape it to your shirt. Write your initials on the seals. When people choose their candy, pretend to weigh it on the scale. Put the candy in a bag, fold over the top and staple it with a seal.

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Week 29 {tiny paintings project}

This week: PENCIL FLYERS

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I love back to school supply shopping.  I continue to do it even though it’s been years since I was in school.  In these examples I’ve kept the species separate. But feel free to mix up the birds and the bees.

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GET THE ARTWORK HERE

Or, get the artwork in the "artwork downloads" column to the right. Print it out on 4" x 6" photo paper, and make sure the print size is 100%. You might need to save the file and print using a photo application.

This art is only for your personal use, and may not be reproduced.  And please, if you use my artwork, send me a picture of what you made, so I can pin it to my pinterest board.

Week_29_layout

FIG. 1 Supplies: glue, detail scissors, X-acto knife, printout, baker’s twine, markers, pencils, masking tape, waxed or parchment paper, glue brush, trimming (ribbon or crepe paper), and poster board. I used 3-ply and it was a little hard to cut. Use thinner board if you are not comfortable with the X-acto blade.

FIG. 2 Roughly cut around one of each animal from the printout. Glue them to the board. Spread the glue around with a brush to get it right up to the edges. Press the board between parchment paper, under a heavy stack of books until the glue is dry.

FIG. 2 Carefully cut out the other half of the animals.

FIG. 3 When the glue is dry, use the X-acto knife to cut out the animals mounted on the board.

FIG. 5 You should have two of each animal cut out. One of each, mounted on board.

FIG. 6 Glue a 4” piece of twine to the back of each animal mounted on board. I generally had the string attached somewhere near the animals head.

FIG. 7 Brush an even coat of glue all over the other  half of the animal and pinch the two sides together. Put them back between the parchment paper, under the stack of books.

FIG. 8 When the glue is dry, trim any edges where the layers don’t match up, with the knife. Color the edges with a marker.

FIG. 9 Nine two-sided animals on strings. Hey, these would make nice bookmarks. Just tie the string to a strip of cardstock with a hole punched in the end.  Cute coordinated school supplies!

FIG. 10 lay the pencil down on a piece of masking tape, sticky-side-up. Arrange the strings on the tape so there is a short, medium, and long. Space them evenly so they will end up on three even sides of the pencil.

FIG. 11 Wrap the tape around the pencil. You may have to trim one end of the tape first, so it doesn’t stick to itself.

FIG. 12 Glue and wrap some decorative trimmings around the pencil, to cover the tape and string ends. (Trim the ends of the strings.)

FIG. 13 and FIG. 14 Twirl the pencil to get the birds flying around like a carnival ride.

 

Now, sharpen the pencils and smell, mmmmm back to school smell.


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